Encounter #2

2020.2.14


Location: Monterey
# of killer whales: 4


ID: CA140B (Louise), CA 140B1, CA 140B2, CA 140B3 (Buzz)

In the morning, we spent time with CA140B "Louise", well-known CA140 "Emma"’s daughter: a 19-year-old who was likely born in early 2002. CA140B was traveling with her three offspring, including her newest calf CA140B3 "Buzz", whom we suspect was born in November 2019. The first time that we encountered Louise and her offspring traveling separately (without the rest of the CA140s) was in April 2019. It is normal for a young Bigg's transient mom to leave and start her own small separate matriline; she will periodically have reunions with her mom and relatives. We started seeing the CA140Bs traveling with CA23A2 in April 2020; a new associate. In this Valentine’s Day encounter, Louise and offspring were breaching; they were also bow riding and wake riding - very rarely seen social behaviors!
Video by Jason Berring Jr via Monterey Bay Whale Watch

CA140B and CA140B3
CA140B and CA140B3

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Orca Breaching
Orca Breaching

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Encounter #3B

2020.2.14


Location: Monterey
# of killer whales: 5


ID: T234s

We had a second sighting on February 14th. We found different killer whales later in the day, rare Bigg's transient ("T") killer whales from the Pacific Northwest! This group, the T234s, is composed of five orcas, including two males. They were traveling fast, porpoising through the waves! This was only the third time, to our knowledge, that they have been seen in California - including once in Southern California! T234 is most likely the mom of all these whales; confirmed mom of T234A.

Per Jared Towers (scientific advisor for CKWP), these whales have been seen just seven times in British Columbia since 2004! 
Check out this beautiful drone footage from our encounter, by Jason Berring Jr (Monterey Bay Whale Watch)

T235
T235

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T235
T235

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T234 Family
T234 Family

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